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CAMMIGRES Migration Reading Group in History Jan to May 2015

The Migration Reading Group in History

B4 Institute of Criminology / Michaelhouse Café

Weds 11-12.30 – for future dates join CAMMIGRES Forum mailing list contact: cammigres@gmail.com  or contact group convener Hira Amin: hfa25@cam.ac.uk

The reading group is a space to deepen your understanding of key concepts in migration, and meet other graduate students and postdocs who share migration-related research interests. It is an informal and relaxed environment and it is not compulsory to attend all sessions to be part of the group. All graduate students and early career researchers are welcome to join. New members are always welcome.

We have created a facebook group in order to continue any discussions and also share resources. When you join you will find a link to a shared googledoc where people can type in any useful resources they have found on migration. You can search and request to join the group, it is called 'Cambridge Graduate Migration Research Group'

https://www.facebook.com/groups/880992665278737/

Please email Hira Amin (hfa25@cam.ac.uk) if you are interested in joining the reading group.

Prior Meetings and texts January to May 2015

28th Jan, 2015 – Intro texts

Harzig, C., Hoerder, D. and Gabaccia, D. (2009). What is migration history?. Cambridge, UK: Polity.

11th Feb, 2015 – Intro texts

Castles, S. and Miller, M. (2013). The age of migration. Palgrave Macmillan; 5th edition

Vertovec, S. (2009). Transnationalism. London: Routledge.

25th Feb, 2015  - Culture and migration.

'European Identity and Culture' by Freidman and Thiel

'Migration and Culture' by Cohen and Gunvor. 

If you have time then another useful text is 'Cultural Hybridity' by Peter Burke, which has a large chunk available on googlebooks. 

http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=c12czYLl9NoC&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

11 March, 2015 - Ethnicity and Migration

Widely cited text by Brubaker called 'Ethnicity Without Groups.' For the session please read the Introduction and the first two chapters. 

If anyone has extra time, then feel free to read the entire book and also the introduction to Brubaker's next book is found online here (it is the final link):

http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/soc/faculty/brubaker/

Wednesday 6th May - Language and Migration

Pier Larson, Ocean of Letters: Language and Creolization in an Indian Ocean Diaspora (Cambridge, 2009) first chapter and conclusion available here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/px27l4mdiab0an3/Larson%2C%20Introduction.pdf?dl=0

Isabel Hofmeyr, The Portable Bunyan: A Transnational History of The Pilgrim’s Progress (Princeton, 2003) Introduction available online at:

http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/i7617.pdf

Additional recommended articles:

Martin Nesvig, ‘Spanish Men, Indigenous Language, and Informal Interpreters in Postcontact Mexico’, Ethnohistory (2012), pp.739-64

Alejandro Morales and William Hansen, ‘Language-Brokering: An Integrative Review of the Literature’, Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences (2005), pp.471-503

Frank van Tubergen and Menno Wierenga, ‘The Language Acquisition of Male Immigrants in a Multilingual Destination: Turks and Moroccans in Belgium’, Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies (2011), pp.1039-57

Graham Day, Howard Davis, and Angela Drakakis-Smith, ‘‘There’s One Shop You Don’t Go Into If You Are English’: The Social and Political Integration of English Migrants into Wales’, Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies (2010), pp.1405-23

20 May, 2015 - Migration within a global/transnational context.

Patricia Clavin 'Defining Transnationalism' (2005), OR ‘Time, Manner, Place: Writing Modern European History in Global, Transnational and International Contexts’
 (2010)

Beyond Borders: A History of Mexican Migration to the United States   By Timothy J. Henderson https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=GVtfVlPd1FQC&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&hl=en#v=onepage&q&f=false

J. Belich, Replenishing the Earth (2009)

(http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews/review/895 and

http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/407876.article)

Abulafia's 'Christian merchants in the Mediterranean'

The CAMMIGRES Network

Launched in January 2014, by Co-Founders Professors Madeleine Arnot and Loraine Gelsthorpe, and Research Associate Dr Jessica Wheeler, the Cambridge Migration Research Network, funded by the Vice-Chancellor’s Endowment Fund, brings together a superb tract of migration research, spanning 23 University of Cambridge faculties, departments and centres, including researchers in anthropology, archaeology, history, politics, economics and land economy, geography, sociology, gender studies, psychology, health and education studies, management studies, linguistics, theology, criminology and law.

CAMMIGRES researchers' interests orient around the impacts of past and present migration in relation to human evolution and development, social, legal, and economic policy, governance, professional knowledge, institutional practice and social relations.