skip to primary navigationskip to content

CAMMIGRES

The Cambridge Migration Research Network

Studying at Cambridge

Migration news around the web

Beyond Stock-Taking: The Path Ahead to a Global Compact for Migration

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 12, 2017.

To reflect on the outcomes of the stocktaking meeting in December 2017 on the progress made towards conceptualizing the Global Compact for Migration, MPI hosted a conversation with Eva Åkerman Börje, from the office of the UN Special Representative for International Migration, and Ilse Hahn, from the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development.

Data Show Legalizing DREAMers Would Have Little Effect on Displacing U.S.-Born Millennials from Jobs

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 12, 2017.

WASHINGTON — Amid debate over legalization for unauthorized immigrants who came to the United States as children, concern has been raised that these DREAMers, once legalized, would take jobs away from U.S. citizens, in particular black and other minority populations. A new Migration Policy Institute (MPI) commentary, which examines the characteristics of DREAMers and the similarly aged U.S.

Top 10 of 2017 – Issue #5: As Displacement Becomes Long-Term, Refugee Hosts Grapple with New Normal

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 12, 2017.

Millions of displaced people were unable to return home in 2017, and countless others found themselves newly displaced. Targeted violence in Myanmar caused more than 624,000 Rohingya to flee to Bangladesh, and conflict in South Sudan drove at least 668,000 abroad. Some first-asylum countries, such as Uganda and Turkey, were largely accommodating, while others, such as Jordan and Lebanon, pressured refugees to leave.

Top 10 of 2017 – Issue #6: In Wake of Cuts to U.S. Refugee Program, Global Resettlement Falls Short

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 12, 2017.

The global refugee resettlement landscape changed dramatically in 2017, as the United States began to step back from its role as global leader on resettlement. The Trump administration reduced the 2018 refugee admissions ceiling to the lowest level since the program began in 1980. While other countries increased their commitments or launched new programs, this was not enough to make up for the gap left by the United States.

Will DREAMers Crowd U.S.-Born Millennials Out of Jobs?

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 12, 2017.

The debate over the future of DACA participants and the passage of legislation to legalize them and a broader cohort of DREAMers features a number of arguments pro and con. Opposition centers in part on the premise of widespread labor market competition between DREAMers and the U.S. born, particularly minorities. But as as this commentary explains, analysis shows that the case is a weak one.

Top 10 of 2017 – Issue #7: Increased Focus on Forced Return of Migrants and Asylum Seekers Puts Many in Peril

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 08, 2017.

Governments on the receiving end of migrants and refugees reinforced their commitment to returns in 2017, sending or coercing migrants to move back to impoverished or violent homelands. The Dominican Republic pushed out some 70,000 Haitians and native born of Haitian descent, while more than 500,000 Afghans left Iran and Pakistan. Though many of these migrants chose to return, in practice the line between forced and voluntary returns is blurry.

Top 10 of 2017 – Issue #8: Despite Progress on Brexit Negotiations, Fate of Millions of EU and UK Nationals Still Hangs in the Balance

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 08, 2017.

As Brexit negotiations move forward, the issue of the future rights for EU nationals resident in the United Kingdom and UK nationals living on the continent has emerged as a sticking point. Though negotiators in early December 2017 agreed to a skeletal deal on citizens' rights, countless details remain to be worked out, leaving the future of some 4 million people unresolved—with implications for them, their families, employers, and others.

Top 10 of 2017 – Issue #9: Nativism Goes Mainstream, Moving the Needle on Migration Policy

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 07, 2017.

In 2017, nationalists in Europe and the United States continued seizing on public concerns about immigration and diversity, making gains in pushing their agendas. While their success at the polls was mixed, nativist politicians have succeeded in reshaping broader migration debates, with growing political fragmentation and mistrust of establishment parties making it easier for them to break through.

With Cooperation on Migration Moving Higher on the Foreign Policy Agenda, Significant Room Exists for Improvement of Partnerships along the Migration Continuum

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 07, 2017.

WASHINGTON — In the wake of the migration crisis in Europe, a surge in Central American flows to the United States and movements elsewhere, policymakers are looking for new strategies to better manage migration. The events of 2015-2016 in Europe illustrated the shortcomings of unilateral approaches to migration, with policies aimed at closing borders often diverting rather than stemming flows, and resulting in more deadly conditions for migrants.

Limited results of AU-EU summit demonstrate difficulty of third-country partnerships with tight near-term focus & mismatched goals

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 06, 2017.

BRUSSELS — The failure of last week’s African Union-European Union summit to produce tangible commitments on migration, beyond a long-overdue plan to evacuate thousands of African migrants stranded in Libya, demonstrates the difficulty of partnerships that do not reflect the contexts and priorities of all partners, as a new report outlines.

Beyond Stock-Taking: The Path Ahead to a Global Compact for Migration

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 06, 2017.

Top 10 of 2017 – Issue #10: In Latin America, Spike in Migrant Arrivals Prompts Flurry of Reponses

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 05, 2017.

Migration surged throughout South America in 2017, challenging governments to keep up with inflows. Brazil, Colombia, and Peru worked to process record numbers of Venezuelan asylum applications, and launched special visa programs for some new arrivals. While the government responses have been largely welcoming, the illegal immigration of Haitians provoked more restrictive policy reactions in Chile and Argentina.

Building Partnerships to Respond to the Next Decade’s Migration Challenges (Transatlantic Council Statement)

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 04, 2017.

As destination countries look for ways to better manage migration, many are seeking to build or strengthen collaboration with origin and transit countries. While many partnerships share similar goals—limiting arrivals, returning unauthorized migrants, and addressing migration’s root causes—their outcomes vary. This Transatlantic Council Statement examines the factors behind these mixed results and offers recommendations to make partnerships succeed.

EU Migration Partnerships: A Work in Progress

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 01, 2017.

In 2016, the European Union announced with fanfare a new Migration Partnership Framework to inform cooperation with countries of origin and transit. While the bloc has long recognized collaboration as key to achieving its migration-management aims, EU partnerships face persistent challenges, including looking beyond short-term enforcement goals and taking into account partner needs, capacity, and objectives.

Top 10 Migration Issues of 2017

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 01, 2017.

The migration world in 2017 was marked by large-scale displacement in Southeast Asia and Africa, rightward political shifts in the United States and parts of Europe, and varied approaches to migration management across the world. MPI experts highlight the biggest migration developments of the year in this countdown of the Top 10 Migration Issues of 2017.

Legalization for DREAMers Would Result in Chain Migration of an Average of 1 Person or Less Over a Lifetime—Far Fewer than Critics Suggest, MPI Estimates

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Nov 30, 2017.

WASHINGTON — With Congress facing growing calls to pass DREAM Act-type legislation before the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program expires, critics are arguing that legalization would spur vast new “chain migration” because DREAMers could eventually sponsor their family members for green cards. In fact, they argue that each unauthorized immigrant legalized via the DREAM Act could sponsor as many as 6.4 relatives, on average, for legal permanent residence.

Legalization for DREAMers: A Realistic Appraisal of Potential Chain Migration

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Nov 30, 2017.

Amid growing calls for Congress to pass DREAM Act-type legislation, critics are arguing that legalization would spur vast new "chain migration" because DREAMers could eventually sponsor their relatives for green cards. MPI estimates the numbers who could receive legal permanent residence as a result of sponsorship by DREAMers would be far lower, for a range of reasons explained in this commentary.

As Afghanistan Seeks to Reintegrate Unprecedented Number of Returnees, New MPI Report Examines Limitations of Current Return and Reintegration Policies

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Nov 29, 2017.

WASHINGTON — With as many as 1 million people forcibly returned to Afghanistan in 2016 alone and more than 5.2 million refugees assisted in their return to Afghanistan since the fall of the Taliban in 2002, the nature of return policies and reintegration assistance from European governments and others merit significant attention.

From Forced Migration to Forced Returns in Afghanistan: Policy and Program Implications

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Nov 29, 2017.

With 1 million people forcibly returned to Afghanistan in 2016 alone, the nature of return policies and reintegration assistance from European governments and others merits significant attention. This report examines the implications that returns present for those who are returned, Afghan society, and the migration-management and development objectives of the countries that are initiating the returns.

Tens of Thousands in United States Face Uncertain Future, as Temporary Protected Status Deadlines Loom

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Nov 29, 2017.

The Trump administration’s announcement that it will end Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for nationals of Haiti, Nicaragua, and Sudan has brought unprecedented attention to the program and its future. Established in 1990, TPS offers work authorization and deportation relief to foreign nationals already in the United States unable to return to countries embroiled in conflict or the effects of a natural disaster. This Policy Beat explores past and current TPS designations and debates surrounding the program.

The CAMMIGRES Network

Launched in January 2014, by Co-Founders Professors Madeleine Arnot and Loraine Gelsthorpe, and Research Associate Dr Jessica Wheeler, the Cambridge Migration Research Network, funded by the Vice-Chancellor’s Endowment Fund, brings together a superb tract of migration research, spanning 23 University of Cambridge faculties, departments and centres, including researchers in anthropology, archaeology, history, politics, economics and land economy, geography, sociology, gender studies, psychology, health and education studies, management studies, linguistics, theology, criminology and law.

CAMMIGRES researchers' interests orient around the impacts of past and present migration in relation to human evolution and development, social, legal, and economic policy, governance, professional knowledge, institutional practice and social relations.