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GMDAC: Over 6,600 Migration Deaths Recorded in Africa Since 2013 ‘Just the Tip of the Iceberg’

By jules from News. Published on Dec 18, 2018.

Berlin – Today (18/12) IOM’s Missing Migrants Project (MMP) will publish records from hundreds of eyewitness reports of deaths during migration in Africa, bringing the total number of deaths recorded on the continent to 1,386 this year.

MMP researchers explain that with these latest data, the total number of deaths of migrants confirmed on the continent is an estimated 6,615 in just the last five years.

The new records added today to 2018’s total – amounting to information on 1,014 previously unknown fatalities – are based on surveys conducted by the Mixed Migration Centre’s Monitoring Mechanism Initiative (4Mi). However, 4Mi’s surveys represent only a small fraction of the overall number of people on the move in Africa – meaning that these thousands of deaths are likely a substantial undercount of the true number. 

In the absence of official, systematic and intraregional information sources on migration flows in Africa, surveys such as those conducted by 4mi reveal important information about the experiences – including significant risks – that people face on routes within the continent.

Though much African migration is regular and takes places within Africa itself, the newly published evidence underscores the monumental risks that migrants can face on their journeys, and just how little we know about them.

“When people don’t have access to legal migration routes and few reliable records exist, would-be migrants face vulnerability at the hands of human traffickers and smugglers,” said Dr. Frank Laczko, Director of IOM’s Data Analysis Centre in Berlin, where the Missing Migrants Project is based.

Many of the deaths recorded by the Missing Migrants Project are concentrated on routes used by smugglers. Most migration deaths reported within Africa appear to have occurred while migrants are en route to Libya: deaths recorded since 2014 are predominately in the Sahara Desert, northern Niger, southern Libya, and northern Sudan.

The main causes of death recorded indicate that many migrant deaths in Africa are preventable. Starvation, dehydration, physical abuse, sickness and lack of access to medicines are causes of death frequently cited by the migrants who reported deaths on routes within Africa. Involvement with human smugglers and traffickers in human beings can put people in extremely risky situations in which they have little agency to protect themselves, let alone fellow travellers they see being abused.

It is nearly impossible to verify the identities of those who reportedly died or where they intended to migrate.  Missing Migrants Project data identify the deaths of 1,275 men, 534 women and 336 children and teens – which is less than one third of the 6,615 fatalities recorded in Africa in the last five years.  Beyond the age and gender of this small proportion of the dataset, little more is known about the deceased.

What is known is that the proportion of migrants who reportedly witnessed the death of a fellow traveller is alarmingly high: 16 per cent of migrants interviewed by 4Mi in East Africa in 2018 reported having done so, as well as 12 per cent of those surveyed in North Africa. Just under 6 per cent of those surveyed in West Africa had similarly witnessed a death.

Multiple interviewees reported witnessing the deaths of their fellow migrants on several occasions. Very little support is provided to migrants who have witnessed such traumatic events.

“People who witness fellow migrants die often have no way to report what they have seen, not to mention experiencing significant psychosocial stress,” said Dr. Laczko.  “When you consider that survey results may be the only evidence of these deaths, it is clear that these records represent the tip of the iceberg and that the human loss of life is of unknown proportions.”

While survey data represent one of the few sources of information on deaths during migration in Africa, they are largely unverifiable. However (as IOM recommends in its most recent volume of the  Fatal Journeys report series), in areas where few institutions collect data on missing migrants – or where access is an issue – surveys can provide crucial data on deaths and the risks people face during migration.

The Missing Migrants Project records migrant deaths that take place during migration journeys, which means that the deaths of people in detention centres, those who are displaced in their own country or whose deaths may be connected to their irregular status in other countries, are not included.  Reports of missing people are also not included. To avoid double counting the same incidents, IOM staff do not record reports that may be duplicates.

However, the lack of official and unofficial reports on deaths during migration and the relatively small number of migrants surveyed in Africa indicate that MMP data in Africa represent a minimum estimate of the true number of migrant deaths. 

For the latest data on migrant deaths in Africa, visit the Missing Migrants Project website here. Anonymized Missing Migrants Project data can be downloaded from missingmigrants.iom.int/downloads

For more information please contact:  Julia Black, Missing Migrants Project. Tel: +49 3027-8778 27. Email: jblack@iom.int 

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Tuesday, December 18, 2018 - 15:48
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An estimated 6,615 deaths during migration reported in Africa in the last five years. Photo: IOM 

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Star-studded Award Ceremony for Global Migration Film Festival in Cairo

By jules from News. Published on Dec 18, 2018.

Cairo – Today, on International Migrants Day, the Global Migration Film Festival draws to a close at the historic Al-Manial Palace in Cairo, Egypt, culminating the most successful edition held so far. 

A truly worldwide festival run by the International Organization for Migration (IOM) in partnership with United Nations Information Centres worldwide, it has already seen 558 screenings take place in 161 cities and over 103 countries, a number that is up 50 per cent from last year. 

Drawing on volunteers from the IOM and its partners wherever it takes place, this year’s festival showcases dramas, comedies, as well as gritty documentaries that bring the reality of the migrant experience to the silver screen. Over 800 films were submitted for possible inclusion in this year’s festival, IOM’s third. 

IOM’s regional office for the Middle East, one of nine such offices globally, hosts this year’s festival under the auspices of Egypt’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MOFA).

 “We selected Cairo to be the first capital outside IOM’s Geneva headquarters to host the closing awards ceremony of this important festival in recognition of Egypt’s leading cultural and political role in the Middle East and North Africa region as well as in the African continent, and in particular its leadership in migration governance,” said Carmela Godeau, IOM Regional Director for MENA. 

Opening the ceremony in Cairo is a live music show, followed by welcoming addresses by high-level governmental and IOM representatives, and the award ceremony. 

The event’s Guest of Honour will be Egyptian superstar and UN Goodwill Ambassador Yosra. “I am proud to support such a great initiative highlighting the important role cinema plays in building bridges through telling stories that give viewers a glimpse into the lives, circumstances and feelings of others.” said Yosra.  

The evening will also include side photo exhibitions by IOM and the United Nations Information Center (UNIC). 

Al-Manial Palace is said to have been built for Prince Mohammad Ali between 1899 and 1929. He had the Palace designed in a style integrating European Art Nouveau and Rococo with many traditional Islamic architecture styles including Ottoman, Moorish, and Persian. Historically, the Prince’s family had hosted lectures, concerts and poetry readings in the vast venue and gardens.  

The palace and estate have been preserved by the Antiquities Council, as a historic house, museum and estate, reflecting the settings and lifestyle of the late 19th- and early 20th-century Egyptian royal family. 

“We’re pleased to host the GMFF closing ceremony at such a historic and culturally vibrant venue; and to honour the aesthetic of the place we’ve tailored a lively and culturally bound evening. Our ceremony will bring together a big number of celebrities with governmental representatives, diplomats, United Nations representatives, international partners, and the private sector,” said Laurent De Boeck, IOM Egypt’s Chief of Mission. 

Updates will be provided throughout the day on the following platforms: 

  • RO Cairo’s Social Media Pages: Twitter: @IOM_MENA; Facebook: @IOM.MENA
  • IOM Egypt’s Social Media Pages: Twitter: @iominegypt; Facebook: @IOMEgypt 

For more information, please contact Farah Abdul Sater, Tel: +201060351567, Email: fabdulsater@iom.int 

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Tuesday, December 18, 2018 - 15:50
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Bangladeshi Survivors of Andaman Sea Crisis Find New Livelihoods in Hydroponic Farming

By jules from News. Published on Dec 18, 2018.

Dhaka – IOM has established three large-scale vegetable farms equipped with hydroponic farming technologies to support the sustainable economic reintegration of a group of Bangladeshi migrants who returned home after the 2015 Andaman Sea crisis. 

During the crisis, thousands of young Bangladeshis left the country by sea in search of better job opportunities in Malaysia. Many fell into the hands of traffickers and smugglers and suffered terrible exploitation and abuse. Eventually, IOM, in partnership with the Bangladeshi, Malaysian, Thai and Indonesian authorities, managed to help 2,813 of them to return home. 

IOM then supported 200 returnees with psychosocial counselling and reintegration assistance, which led to the creation of a community-based social enterprise model called Returnees Economic Development (RED). 

The hydroponic vegetable farms were established through RED and operate in a shared ownership business model, jointly owned by the returnees and a managing local entity. While the local partner organizations serve as a managing body, over 80 per cent of the shares are held by the returnees, giving them ownership and the stability needed to sustain the project in the long run. 

“One particular issue returnees face is the lack of sustainable solutions that help them to become more resilient and self-dependent,” said Sharon Dimanche, IOM’s Deputy Chief of Mission in Bangladesh. “Through RED, these returnees are brought into a business cycle that increases their accountability and efficiency in the long run due to its unique structure.” 

Hydroponics, which allow farmers to grow crops in greenhouses faster than traditional methods, without using soil or chemical fertilizers, is relatively new to Bangladesh. Each farm involved a capital investment of approximately USD 8,300 and is expected to break even within three to four years.  

Despite efforts to promote safe, orderly, demand-driven migration, many poor Bangladeshis continue to opt for irregular land and sea routes. The reasons often include lack of information and exploitation by unscrupulous middlemen.   

For more information please contact Chowdhury Asif Mahmud Bin Harun at IOM Bangladesh, Email: mbinharun@iom.int, Tel. +880 1755509476

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Tuesday, December 18, 2018 - 15:45
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A hydroponic vegetable farm in Narshingdi, Bangladesh produces 4.2 tonnes of vegetables every three months. Photo: IOM 2018 

A hydroponic vegetable farm in Narshingdi, Bangladesh produces 4.2 tonnes of vegetables every three months. Photo: IOM 2018 

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'Help Us, Help More': Support IOM’s Efforts to Assist Vulnerable Venezuelans

By jules from News. Published on Dec 18, 2018.

Geneva – In line with the global theme for International Migrants Day 2018, Migration with Dignity, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) calls on the public to take action and help support vulnerable refugees and migrants from Venezuela in Latin America and the Caribbean.

IOM is reaching out to sympathetic and motivated allies of migrants to be part of the solution. The first in a series of IOM calls for action, Help us, Help more will share stories of the dignity, strength and resilience of people on the move, and will encourage individuals to support vulnerable refugees and migrants along their journeys, through online donations.

There are three million refugees and migrants from Venezuela, of which 2.4 million have left their homes and livelihoods behind in the last three years, in search of a better future. Travelling by air, road or on foot, on average 5,500 Venezuelans have left the country every day in 2018.

Emily Durán, 39, from Valencia, Venezuela, travelled over 1,700 kilometres to Cali, Colombia, where she was making a temporary stop before heading to the Colombia-Ecuador border town of Ipiales. IOM spoke to her about her six-week long journey:

“There were many difficult times on the way,” she explained. “I walked from Cúcuta to Cali… We had to sleep on the streets and had to keep walking for kilometres. It felt like we would never arrive.”

Watch the full interview with Emily Durán here.

Many of the refugees and migrants who enter Colombia opt to remain. Others, like Durán, are making plans to move onwards to Ecuador, Perú, Chile or Argentina. Brazil, México, and select Central American and Caribbean countries have also received Venezuelans.

“Some days I wish I hadn’t left my country, just to face even more troubles,” said Durán. IOM missions in the field provide lifesaving assistance to Venezuelan refugees and migrants through the distribution of food, medicine and emergency kits. In some countries IOM helps Venezuelans find temporary housing, while in others IOM operates transit shelters. Family reunification and cultural integration of Venezuelans, also part of IOM’s mission, help ease the transition into their new lives.

Host communities and governments have been generous with their support. But we need to do more: Help us, Help more

For more information please contact Deepika Nath at IOM Geneva, Tel: +41 22 717 9897, Email: dnath@iom.int

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Tuesday, December 18, 2018 - 15:40
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IOM encourages individuals to support vulnerable migrants along their journeys through online donations. Photo: IOM 

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Afghanistan Launches National Referral Mechanism and Online Database to Combat Human Trafficking

By jules from News. Published on Dec 18, 2018.

Kabul – Afghanistan, with support from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and IOM, has launched a National Referral Mechanism and Trafficking in Persons (TIP) Online Database to strengthen counter-trafficking protection measures in the country.

Participants at Sunday’s (16/12) Kabul launch included Afghan government officials from the High Level Trafficking in Persons Commission, representatives of counter-trafficking-related national and international NGOs, UN agencies and media. 

“By passing a new trafficking law, finalizing the national referral mechanism and developing an online database of victims, we have created a good foundation to respond to human trafficking in a more comprehensive way. I hope this will assist victims of trafficking with services they deserve,’’ said Afghan Justice Minister and the Chair of the TIP High Commission Dr. Abdul Basir Anwar. “All stakeholders in Afghanistan need to work together to protect victims and prosecute traffickers,” he noted. 

USAID Acting Deputy Mission Director Elizabeth Chambers told delegates that women, men and children from economically marginalized communities are at the greatest risk of trafficking in Afghanistan. 

“Trafficking in persons affects the most vulnerable in our societies, particularly women and youth.  USAID and the US government will continue to stand with the Afghan people against these horrific practices that undermine the rule of law, corrupt global commerce, foster gender inequality and threaten global security,” she said. 

IOM Afghanistan Chief of Mission and Special Envoy Laurence Hart noted that due to the absence of a centralized national database and referral mechanism, counter-trafficking stakeholders in Afghanistan are often not able to identify, refer and assist the victims of trafficking properly. 

“This national referral mechanism and online database will help the Afghan government strengthen protection measures and effectively implement the new law to combat the trafficking and smuggling of people,” he said. 

The US State Department’s Trafficking in Persons Report 2018 noted that Afghanistan is a source, transit and destination country for men, women, and children subjected to forced labour and sexual exploitation. More internal than cross-border trafficking occurs in Afghanistan. But in recent years IOM has observed a steady increase in young women trafficked to Afghanistan from neighboring countries, notably Pakistan. 

Most Afghan victims of trafficking are women and children. While women are subjected to sexual and non-sexual exploitation, children are largely trafficked to work in carpet weaving and brick factories, domestic servitude, as bacha bazi (dancing boys) or for forced begging. Victims are often sold by economically desperate families or kidnapped. As elsewhere, traffickers frequently subject their victims to coercion, violence and emotional abuse. Once abroad, traffickers usually confiscate their victims’ travel documents, highlighting the importance of trans-border cooperation to identify and assist victims. 

For more information please contact Eva Schwoerer at IOM Afghanistan. Tel: + 93 729 229 129.  Email: eschwoerer@iom.int

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Tuesday, December 18, 2018 - 15:35
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Afghan, USAID and IOM officials launch the National Referral Mechanism and TIP Online Database in Kabul. Photo: IOM.

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Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 111,558 in 2018; Deaths Reach 2,217

By jules from News. Published on Dec 18, 2018.

Geneva – IOM, the International Organization for Migration, reports that 111,558 migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea in 2018 through 16 December. This year is the fifth straight during which the arrival of irregular migrants and refugees has topped the 100,000 threshold – although 2018’s total is low compared to those recorded at this time in 2017 (167,916) and 2016 (358,018)  (See Table 1). 

IOM’s Missing Migrants Project (MMP) has recorded 2,217 people have died this year crossing the Mediterranean on one of three major sea routes. The Mediterranean continues to account for the clear majority of deaths recorded globally. However, it is important to note that there are few reliable sources of information on deaths during migration, which means that data for some regions – including the Mediterranean – are likely incomplete.

In the Western Mediterranean, Spanish rescue services retrieved the body of a man 28 miles off the coast of Ceuta, Spain on 6 December. The Missing Migrants Project team has documented the deaths of 744 people in the waters between North Africa and Spain, compared with 224 on this route through the full year 2017. The team reports that there has been a consistent increase in the number of migrant deaths recorded in the Western Mediterranean each year since IOM began keeping track.

IOM’s Missing Migrants Project has recorded 4,476 people who have died or gone missing on migratory routes across the globe in 2018 (see Table 3).

In the Americas, two deaths have been added to the MMP data base since last week. On 8 December, a seven-year-old girl from Guatemala died shortly after crossing the border into New Mexico. She had travelled through Mexico to the US southern border with her father, with the aim of seeking asylum in the US. She died in a hospital in El Paso, Texas of dehydration and septic shock. On 12 December, the body of a man was found on the Río Bravo near Miguel Alemán, in Mexico’s state of Tamaulipas.

Missing Migrants Project data are compiled by IOM staff based at its Global Migration Data Analysis Centre but come from a variety of sources, some of which are unofficial. To learn more about how data on migrants' deaths and disappearances are collected, click here

For latest arrivals and fatalities in the Mediterranean, click here. Learn more about the Missing Migrants Project.  

See contacts here

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Tuesday, December 18, 2018 - 15:30
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IOM, Nepali Local Government Partner to Build Multi-Purpose Evacuation Centre

By jules from News. Published on Dec 18, 2018.

Kathmandu – IOM and Changu Narayan Municipality in Bhaktapur District in the Kathmandu Valley have begun work on a multi-purpose evacuation centre to accommodate displaced people in the event of a natural disaster. The initiative is part of an IOM project: People to People Support for Building Community Resilience through Recovery and Reconstruction in Nepal (P2P) funded by the Royal Thai Government.

In 2015 earthquakes in Nepal displaced approximately 2.8 million people. Some 117,700 people in the 14 worst affected districts were forced to find shelter in makeshift camps. The year before, heavy rains resulted in flooding across 35 of Nepal’s 77 districts. More than 190,000 houses were destroyed or partially damaged, displacing tens of thousands of people and leaving many homeless.

Thai Ambassador to Nepal Bhakavat Tanskul, IOM Chief of Mission Paul Norton and Changu Narayan Municipality Mayor Som Prasad Mishra attended the ground-breaking ceremony for the centre, which took place on Friday (14 December) at Helmet Danda, Bhaktapur. District officials and representatives of the Ministry of Urban Development, the Armed Forces and the community also took part.

Addressing the crowd, Ambassador Bhakavat said: “Today’s event is an auspicious moment for our two countries. It represents Thailand’s support to strengthen disaster risk reduction and empower Nepali people in (this) disaster-prone area… The funds for this project came from the Thai people under the Thai Heart for Nepal programme to help Nepal recover from the 2015 earthquake."

“Post-earthquake reconstruction work in Nepal is an opportunity to incorporate risk reduction measures, while rebuilding damaged infrastructure to eliminate pre-existing vulnerabilities. We have to increase resilience to future hazards in this highly disaster-prone country,” said IOM Chief of Mission Paul Norton.

“This pre-designated, multi-hazard resistant community centre will be used to host displaced people, giving priority to the most vulnerable, including pregnant women, children, people with special needs and the elderly,” he added.

The centre will also serve as a venue for community activities, including women’s and youth groups, community-based training, recreational pursuits, adult literacy classes, information dissemination and income generating activities.

Following the 2015 earthquake, open spaces in the Kathmandu Valley previously identified by the authorities with support from IOM immediately became camp cities. Some surviving infrastructure such as schools and community buildings were also used for immediate shelter, medical and humanitarian assistance.

Changu Narayan Municipality Mayor Som Prasad Mishra said that the evacuation centre would be another stepping stone towards his municipality’s commitment to build a disaster-resilient community with better facilities. He thanked Thailand and IOM for their support for the municipality’s disaster preparedness, disaster risk reduction and resilience efforts.

IOM plans to build similar multi-purpose structures in seven other municipalities in earthquake affected districts – Kathmandu, Lalitpur, Gorkha, Dhading, Rasuwa, Sindhupalchowk and Dolakha. UNDP and other humanitarian agencies have agreed to provide water, sanitation and hygiene facilities.

 

For more information please contact:

Paul I. Norton at IOM Nepal, Tel: +97714426250, Email: iomnepal@iom.int. Or Ministry of Urban Development, Department of Urban Development & Building Construction, Tel: +977 1 4211673, Email: info@moud.gov.np

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Tuesday, December 18, 2018 - 15:38
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IOM, Thai and Nepali officials take part in the groundbreaking ceremony for an evacuation center at Changu Narayan Municipality in Bhaktapur District, Nepal. Photo: IOM 2018 

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IOM Holds Workshop on Alternatives to Detention in Libya

By jules from News. Published on Dec 18, 2018.

Tripoli – The International Organization for Migration (IOM), with technical support from the International Detention Coalition (IDC), ran a workshop, Practices and Procedures of Alternatives to Detention in Libya, last week in Tripoli. 

Stakeholders from the Ministry of Social Affairs, Ministry of Interior (DCIM), the Libyan Coast Guard and embassies of countries of origin of migrants in Libya discussed alternatives to detention (ATD) in Libya to enhance early identification and protection of vulnerable migrants, particularly for unaccompanied and separated children. 

In a context where migrants residing in or transiting through Libya are frequently transferred to detention centres, IOM seeks to promote and operationalize alternatives that allow for a more rights-based and protection-sensitive management of migration flows. 

Officials from the Ministry of Social Affairs shared IOM’s concern about the continued detention of children and encouraged a closer collaboration with IOM and the Ministry of Interior to end the detention of children. 

‘’It is important to uphold basic child protection principles, such as the right to a safe learning environment,” said Mabrouka al-Ouzoumi, Head of the Women Welfare Department in the Ministry of Social Affairs. She called on the humanitarian community to work with Libyan authorities to establish alternatives to detention for children. 

During the workshop, participants discussed practical procedures for identifying and transferring migrants from disembarkation points and detention centres to alternative housing. They put forward concrete recommendations to a draft strategic roadmap on alternatives to detention. 

IOM Libya and IDC began co-drafting this roadmap in 2018 to address the arbitrary detention of migrants and identify alternatives to detention. 

‘’Complementing our ongoing work, the new strategy includes advocacy and coordination, capacity building and technical support and operationalising alternatives to detention on the ground. It is designed to support the most vulnerable migrants in extremely challenging situations,’’ said Insaf Mounadi, IOM Libya’s Protection Officer on Alternatives to Detention. 

In partnership with IDC, IOM also briefed the participants on the six-month capacity-building plan on alternatives to detention for Libyan officials and consular authorities. A series of courses will train frontline staff to conduct vulnerability assessments and screen migrants eligible for alternatives. 

This workshop, funded by the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development, makes way for the increased focus IOM will place on alternatives to detention in 2019. 

For more information please contact Maya Abu Ata at IOM Libya, Tel: +218 91 002 4839, Email: mabuata@iom.int

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Tuesday, December 18, 2018 - 15:20
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Karolina Edsbacker, IOM Libya’s Protection Officer, facilitating the workshop. Photo: IOM/Elnakua 

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Norway Supports Voluntary Return and Reintegration of Stranded Migrants in Morocco

By jules from News. Published on Dec 18, 2018.

Marrakech – Merethe Nergaard, Ambassador of the Kingdom of Norway, and Ana Fonseca, Chief of Mission of the International Organization for Migration (IOM) in Morocco signed an agreement to award a grant of NOK 4,000,000 (approx. EUR 400,000) to IOM as a contribution to the ‘RAISE’ programme (Voluntary Return and Reintegration for Stranded Migrants in Morocco). 

“We are pleased to continue our support to RAISE, contributing to IOM and Morocco's efforts to assist stranded migrants who wish to return to their home country,” said Marianne Hagen, State Secretary at the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. She headed the Norwegian delegation to the intergovernmental conference to adopt the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (GCM). Hagen, together with António Vitorino, Director General of IOM, attended the signing of the agreement. 

Morocco has over the years become a key location on the perilous journey of thousands of migrants, mostly from sub-Saharan countries, to Europe. Migrants fleeing poverty, lack of opportunities or increasing violence continue to arrive in Morocco, making the North African country both a destination and transit country. However, many of these migrants end up being stranded in Morocco, leaving them vulnerable to becoming victims to abuse and exploitation at the hands of smugglers and traffickers. 

Consequently, Morocco and IOM launched an Assisted Voluntary Return and Reintegration programme in 2005 to offer the possibility of a dignified return through provision of administrative, logistical, financial support – including reintegration assistance – to migrants unable or unwilling to remain in Morocco, and who decide to return to their country of origin. 

For more information, please contact: Myriam Massaia, IOM Morocco, Tel: +212 (0) 537 65 28 81, Email: mmassaia@iom.int

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Tuesday, December 18, 2018 - 15:15
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Kenya Launches First Migration Studies Institute

By jules from News. Published on Dec 18, 2018.

Nairobi – The Kenya Institute of Migration Studies (KIMS) last week launched its flagship course, the Post-Graduate Diploma in Migration Studies, with the first intake expected in 2019. KIMS – the first of its kind in Kenya – will be hosted at the University of Nairobi’s Population Studies and Research Institute.

The East African region remains a major source, transit and destination for migrants. The aim of the course is to improve national and regional migration management to strengthen the capacity of institutions responsible for migration and border management in Kenya, as well as in neighbouring states. 

The development of the diploma course on migration was part was of the Better Migration Management (BMM) programme which aims to improve migration management in the Horn of Africa. BMM is funded through the EU Emergency Trust Fund (EUTF) for Africa by the European Union and the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ). 

KIMS’s journey started in 2016, with the assessment of gaps in migration management in Kenya. BMM implementing partners, IOM and the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) have been supporting the Department of Immigration Services with benchmarking and technical advice, as well as facilitating the National Coordination Mechanism on Migration (NCM). 

The post-graduate diploma will be open to mid-level managers from the Department of Immigration as well as other government officials from Kenya and other parts of Africa. 

“Kenya will open up the post-graduate course to other African countries because better migration management can be achieved through cross-border and inter-country cooperation,” said Dr. Fred Matiang’i, the Cabinet Secretary for Interior and Coordination, speaking at the launch ceremony. “Everyone from Principal Immigration Officer upward must go through this course before they are promoted.” 

Dr. Matiang’i also requested the inclusion of a public relations course in the curriculum, saying this would help improve service delivery to Kenyans and other migrants at ports of entry and exit. 

The Chief of Mission for IOM Kenya, Michael Pillinger, said: “IOM is honoured to be a partner of the Government of Kenya and the Ministry of Interior and Coordination of National Government in addressing key migration management challenges.” 

He also expressed “a special thanks” to the Department of Immigration Services and the NCM for taking the step to launch KIMS, describing it as the first-ever post-graduate diploma course in Kenya focused on Migration Studies. “Kenya continues its tradition of being first in the region. Kenya was the first African nation to be an IOM Member State in 1985,” he said. 

KIMS’s launch follows nine study visits, three of which involved other countries – Ghana, Sudan, and South Sudan – whose governments sought to learn from Kenya and its NCM. 

Pillinger added: “It has been a privilege to support and learn with NCM on harnessing stakeholders’ varied expertise and views for the benefit of Kenya, and the inclusion of migrants and diaspora in these processes. Being a key partner from the conceptualization of the KIMS, and now seeing KIMS a reality, is like a parent seeing its child become a better person at a particular time.”

IOM is one of the main BMM implementing partners alongside UNODC, Expertise France, the Italian Department of Public Security, CIVIPOL, GIZ and the British Council. Apart from Kenya, BMM also covers Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan and Uganda. 

IOM Kenya will support KIMS in establishing a document examination laboratory which will help officers gain practical knowledge and skills in the appraisal of passports and other enabling documents to detect fraud, thus contributing to safe, orderly and regular migration in the region. This will also add to the efforts to prevent trafficking in persons and smuggling of migrants. 

The post-graduate diploma course will cover an introduction to migration studies; legal issues on migration; forced migration; irregular migration; diaspora; and diaspora engagement. Also, on the course will be security and border management; research methods on migration; the effects of migration in countries of origin and destination; data and information management; migration policy; and migration governance, together with leadership for migration practitioners. Students will also be required to embark on a research project. 

For more information please contact Etsuko Inoue at IOM Nairobi, Tel: +254204221000, Email: einoue@iom.int

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Tuesday, December 18, 2018 - 15:10
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Dr. Fred Matiangi, Cabinet Secretary at the Kenyan Ministry of Foreign Affairs, giving his keynote address. Photo: IOM

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Building the Foundations for Inclusion: What Does the Future Hold for Immigrant Integration in Europe?

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 17, 2018.

Top 10 of 2018 – Issue #5: Pushback to the Resistance: Criminalization of Humanitarian Actors Aiding Migrants Rises

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 17, 2018.

As industrialized countries are adopting harder-edge immigration and asylum policies to deal with real and perceived crises, humanitarian actors have sought to blunt the effects of those policies by launching rescue missions at sea, rendering direct aid to migrants in need, and offering legal assistance. A concerted pushback to this resistance emerged in 2018, with governments using legislative, legal, and other tools to fight back.

Top 10 of 2018 – Issue #6: Intensifying Focus on Migrant Returns Takes a More Global Stage

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 14, 2018.

Questions of how, when, and under what conditions migrants and asylum seekers can be returned to their origin countries have featured prominently in international discussions of migration in 2018. Crucially, so too has an increased interest on the part of both destination and origin countries in making reintegration assistance more effective to help ensure that return is sustainable.

Exploring the Potential of Two-Generation Strategies in Refugee Integration

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 14, 2018.

On this webinar, MPI researchers and Utah and Colorado refugee coordinators explore promising practices to better serve refugee families, including education services for refugee youth, innovative efforts to secure better jobs for adult refugees, and other services designed to aid integration over time. They also discuss the potential for implementing and supporting two-generation approaches to refugee integration at a time when the system’s funding and capacity are in peril.  

An Overheated Narrative Unanswered: How the Global Compact for Migration Became Controversial

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 14, 2018.

While the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly, and Regular Migration was formally adopted by 164 of the UN's 193 Member States, it's worth asking how it became a point of contention and ultimately was rejected by more than a dozen countries. The answer? A long lag time between negotiation and adoption, during which overheated claims against it went largely unanswered, as this commentary explores.

Transnational Organized Crime Groups, Immigration, and Border Security: Connections, Distinctions, and Proposals for Effective Policy

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 13, 2018.

Testimony of Andrew Selee, President of MPI, before the Senate Judiciary Committee's Subcommittee on Border Security and Immigration on December 12, 2018 regarding the intersections of transnational crime, immigration, and border security.

Top 10 of 2018 – Issue #7: Asylum Hangover? Governments Seek to Narrow Avenues for Humanitarian Protection

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 13, 2018.

Faced with absorbing vast numbers of asylum seekers who headed to Europe during the 2015-16 migration crisis and the ongoing arrival of much smaller, but steady flows of Central Americans at the U.S.-Mexico border, EU Member States and the United States in 2018 took or explored significant steps to narrow asylum and harden policies.

Report: Amid Extraordinary Pressure on Refugee Resettlement Program, Time Is Ripe to Rethink Ways to Improve Refugee Integration

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 12, 2018.

WASHINGTON – The U.S. refugee resettlement program is facing an extraordinary set of pressures amid an unprecedented reduction in refugee admissions that has triggered drastic funding cuts for the non-governmental agencies that resettle refugees, hollowing out the network’s capacity. These challenges make this a particularly important time to consider how programs can most effectively serve the full spectrum of refugee integration needs.

Promoting Refugee Integration in Challenging Times: The Potential of Two-Generation Strategies

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 12, 2018.

At a time when the U.S. refugee resettlement system is facing unprecedented challenges, innovative and cost-effective tools for supporting refugee integration are in demand. This report explores how a two-generation approach to service provision could help all members of refugee families—from young children to working-age adults and the elderly—find their footing.

Top 10 of 2018 – Issue #8: A Once-Smooth Path for the Global Compact on Migration Becomes Rocky

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 11, 2018.

The world’s first international agreement on migration was approved by 164 countries in December 2018, but not without turbulence. U.S. withdrawal from the nonbinding Global Compact on Safe, Orderly, and Regular Migration, on grounds it could impinge on sovereignty, triggered similar actions by others, particularly in Eastern Europe. Amid ongoing political ripple effects, attention now turns to implementation of the deal's goals.

Top 10 of 2018 – Issue #9: Threat of Hard Brexit Looms as Exit Date Nears

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 10, 2018.

With the United Kingdom’s scheduled March 2019 departure from the European Union around the corner and approval of an exit deal by the UK Parliament in deep disarray, the future for approximately 5 million EU nationals living in the United Kingdom and Britons resident in the EU-27 remained unresolved. This article examines the citizens' rights issues that have arisen and what Brexit, hard or otherwise, might bring.

Top 10 of 2018 – Issue #10: “Silent” Refugee Crises Get Limited International Attention

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 08, 2018.

Despite the major focus by media and publics on a handful of refugee crises around the world, displacement situations worsened during 2018 in a number of countries that received much less attention, including the Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, and South Sudan—where unending conflict, new displacement, rising starvation, and an Ebola outbreak made already complex situations even more dire.

Top 10 Migration Issues of 2018

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 06, 2018.

Amid rising public skepticism and outright opposition to migration in a number of countries, 2018 was marked by a turn to harder policies in places—even as most of the world came together to endorse a first ever international compact on migration. Join us here for a review of the most consequential developments of the year, including escalation of humanitarian crises, in this countdown of the Top 10 Migration Issues of 2018.

Exploring the Potential of Two-Generation Strategies in Refugee Integration

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 06, 2018.

Sweden: By Turns Welcoming and Restrictive in its Immigration Policy

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 05, 2018.

Swedish asylum policy has taken a restrictionist turn since the country received a record-breaking number of asylum seekers in 2015 and after electoral gains by the nationalist, anti-immigration Sweden Democrats pushed the governing coalition to a harder line. Still, other aspects of the country’s migration policy remain welcoming, as this country profile explores.

How Latin America Is Responding to the Venezuelan Exodus

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 05, 2018.

Over 3 million Venezuelans have fled in response to the deepening political and economic crisis in their country, becoming one of the largest and fastest outflows anywhere in the world. Senior officials from Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru, which are home to more than half of these Venezuelan migrants and refugees, discussed their countries' responses to this migration and other experts talked on the broader trend across the region and the prospects for future policy responses.

ChildMove: A Discussion on the Project Following Unaccompanied Young Refugees across Europe

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Dec 05, 2018.

A discussion on the vital new research project, ChildMove, that explores the experiences of young refugees and migrants who have traveled across Europe unaccompanied by their families.

The Road Ahead: Coordination Challenges of Implementing the GCM

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Nov 30, 2018.

Trump Administration’s Unprecedented Actions on Asylum at the Southern Border Hit Legal Roadblock

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Nov 29, 2018.

The Trump administration’s latest effort to narrow the ability to apply for asylum at the U.S.-Mexico border hit a legal roadblock within days of implementation, as has been the pattern for much of its immigration agenda. This article examines the actions on asylum, which alongside deployment of active-duty military to the border, are among measures taken to seek to reduce the flow of Central Americans to the United States.

How Latin America Is Responding to the Venezuelan Exodus

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Nov 28, 2018.

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